As a follow up to my ramblings about Multilingual Wikisource: I have heard some people ask why all Wikisources are not Multilingual Wikisource, like Commons. (I have even heard “Why isn’t Wikisource part of Commons?”)

The latter is easily answered. Aside from the fact that Wikisource needs specific technology to function, it has a different scope and mission to Commons, which would clash if both were part of the same project.

There are many reasons for the former. I think the original was something to do with right-to-left text, which has been solved by now. Others still stand, however.

Disambiguation would be a nightmare, for example. The Bible is complicated enough in English on just one project. Multiple editions in each of hundreds of languages would be ridiculous. This could be solved with, say, namespaces but there are a finite number of namespaces in the MediaWiki software. Besides, the difference between a namespace and a language subdomain is negligible from a technological point of view. The same goes for disambiguation for that matter. A language subdomain is just a bigger version of the concept.

On a different tangent, while Commons is technically multilingual—and a lot of work has gone into supporting that—it is still predominantly English. Community communication is overwhelmingly done in English, English is the default for categories and templates, and so forth. Some grasp of English is often necessary to function on Commons. Language subdomains allow the monolingual (and the multilingual but not anglophone) Wikimedians to take part too, which is more important in curating a library than a media depository.

Obviously, now that we actually have language subdomains, we also have the problems of different cultures and communities on the different projects. Italian doesn’t allow translation, German doesn’t allow non-scans, French doesn’t allow annotation; while some languages, like English and Spanish, are pretty promiscuous in their content. There are likely to many more, seemingly trivial, quirks that are at odds across different projects. If anyone ever did attempt unification, these communities would clash and conflict all over the place, probably ending in either mutually assured destruction or a very small surviving user base.

You may as well ask why Wikipedia bothers with language subdomains when it could just be Multilingual Wikipedia, like Commons.

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